Saturday, August 27, 2011

No matter how hard I try to forget this day-it always comes rushing back

Gone a long time ago-but never forgotten
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=rUgrAAAAIBAJ&sjid=ktQEAAAAIBAJ&pg=1192,5695114&dq=marty+brittingham+nevada+missouri&hl=en

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Marvel Cave, Silver Dollar City, 1970..or "Where's Waldo"????


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Galen, Head Sacker Foodtown 1971


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Mom, Dad and Mandy Main St. House Christmas 1978


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Mom wrote on the back of Shellely's picture-Shelley Lynn Mitchell 2 years and 9 months


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Shelley Aug. 1969


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Shelley's 1st Birthday Picture May 23rd 1969


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Welcome to the 70's!


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Shelley and Marilyn 1970


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Shelley, Marilyn and Thurman 1969-1970


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SHELLEY 1968


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Remember Glamour Shots...


Shelley and Marilyn
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Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Shelley Lynn Mitchell


The family knows me as the picture keeper. Marilyn gave me a little family album of pictures to scan for her. I am just getting around to it!

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Friday, August 12, 2011

Remember When-another memorable article by Richard Carpenter


I remember when Marty was 13 or 14 he played baseball out at the park by the St. Hospital. He did not want to walk all that way so we took his bike. I rode on the back and we coasted down Main St. hill N. to the park. Bummer part of this deal was I had to pedal back up that Main St. hill! Marty always got a ride home after the game with a friends parents. I will always remember this little adventure and how much I enjoyed it!



--- On Fri, 8/12/11, Richard Carpenter <carp3@sbcglobal.net> wrote:




The Bike Racks In Front Of Flory’s
Face book has been abuzz lately with a theme titled, “you know you grew up in Nevada if you remember....” I went back through some of my archives, and found this growing up in Nevada story.  
---------------------
Bike racks were common in my youth, and could be found all over town.  My favorite racks were located in front of Flory’s Drug Store.  
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Of the four, Nevada drug stores/soda fountain businesses located on the square, Flory’s was my favorite.  Each of the pharmacies had its own loyal clientele.  More often than not, this was due to the popularity of their soda fountains,  rather than for the medicines they dispensed.  Pharmacy business back then, was not nearly as important, as today.  We took fewer drugs because it cost money, most families did not have, and there wasn’t an explosion of new drugs like there has been in recent years.
------------------
I liked the Flory’s soda fountain because they had what I considered the best cherry coke in town, rivaled only by the “White Grill’s.”  
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If you rode your bike to the square most any time of the day. there would be numerous bikes parked in racks, right in front of Flory’s.  
----------------------  
As kids we rode our bikes everywhere.  Most families only had one vehicle, and it was rarely used for hauling kids places.  When you needed to go to school, you rode the bus, your bike, or you walked with friends.  There were none of the traffic jams like we see today at the local schools.
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There were bike racks on each side of the square and in front of the Fox Theater.   Numerous racks could be found at all of the grade schools and at the new Junior Senior High School.  At the high school, they opened the lock on the football field every morning and after school for bikers, so no one could steal bikes.  
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Funny thing about that, there were rarely many stolen bikes back then.  I think it had something to do with the fact that everybody’s bike was easily recognized.  We rode them so much they became like an extension of who we were, and most of our friends would have known which one was ours, the moment the saw it.  
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At the hardware stores around the square, and places like Sears and Montgomery Wards, they sold bikes and the parts to keep them in good running order.  It was seldom that you could find a young boy in Nevada who did not know how to take off  a bike tire, and put in a new inner tube, or put on a patch.  
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There were some not to easy rides, for some of our bike trips.  The two worst rides were to Lyons Stadium and the pool at Radio Springs.  Now remember these bikes were almost all the kind that had only one speed.  If someone had a three speed, what we called an “English Bike,” it was really a big deal.  Our bikes were chain drive, with one speed, and of course foot brakes.
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The hill on Ash Street from the corner of the present swimming pool, was a hard pull for a kid, all the way to Highland Street, and the turn to Lyons Stadium.  We always had our baseball gloves over our handle bars, in fact we rarely left home without them.  Baseball gloves were something you broke in just for your hand.  The smell and the feel was something you did not want very far from reach.
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The ride to Radio Springs was the easy part, as the downhill section was on the way there.  It was after a long afternoon of swimming and playing, that you had to face that incredibly steep climb back up College.  Even though the ball field and the pool were on the edges of town, we rode our bikes anyway.  No one would keep us from our activities, and not having a ride from your mom in the family car,  was the norm not the exception.
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Bikes changed a little after I got older.   The guys who were about a decade behind me got into these smaller things that had little wheels and a something called a “banana seat.”  It looked like it took more pedal work to ride them, but they were everywhere.
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Next was the era of the fifteen speeds and the dirt bikes.  None of us would ever do very much curb jumping on our old dinosaurs, they would have broken down.  These off-road models were made for that.  The young guys seemed to be able to climb or jump over anything.
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Now as I look around Nevada, I see few bike riders.  Occasionally there are youngsters on their skateboards, but not very many bikes.  It is as if the time when young kids enjoyed the freedom and range our bikes afforded us, has come and gone.  
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Some of the reasons are obvious.  We don’t let our kids out on their own very much anymore.  It is too dangerous today to let a kid roam, with all the dangerous people there are in the world.  Also kids today have grown up in a time when they are car pooled everywhere.  Just drive by the schools in the morning and evening and look at the traffic.  
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The sad part is, that just like the “PAPER CUPS AND STRAWS,” we used for our cherry coke at Flory’s, the bike has almost disappeared for the present day Nevada kid.  I wonder how these young kids would feel if they got a chance to experience that same freedom that we enjoyed?  
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I doubt that any of us will ever see one of those long double side bike racks around these parts ever again.  Too bad, like the hitching posts from the horse days, the generation that saw bike racks all over town, has passed.   

Tuesday, August 9, 2011

Mom and Pop Grocery Stores and the Brittingham Family


Below Richard Carpenter recalls the little Mom and Pop grocery stores around Nevada in the 50's, 60's and 70's or as I like to say BW (before Walmart) As a Brittingham us kids enjoyed the Cottey Corner Market on W. Cherry St. when we lived at 915 W. Cherry. The best memories were of OB market as it was called by locals (Oberlin and Breckenridge) there Mom and Dad had a monthly charge account, Mom would ring up the store with her daily order and they would deliver for 25 cents! When we needed school supplies we stopped in before school and got our pencils and Big Chief tablets. When we lived on Main St. and Marty got his driver's license he would pick up Mom's daily grocery order before school. We parked in the alley, ran over to the Bakery and off to school. 

Another market was Maxwell's with 2 locations, one on 71 HWY and the other at Atlantic Street. Marilyn and I used to visit Maxwell's with Martha Braswell, our neighbor who we used to spend the weekend with. She let us buy whatever we wanted, CoCo Puffs, blue berry muffins, grape jelly, french toast with peanut butter and the Jiffy Pop stove top popcorn were a few of our favorites. Her husband Max would let me drink coffee with 7 teaspoons of sugar!

In the late 60's Nevada got a Piggy Wiggy and Foodtown stores. These stores competed with each other with gold bond and S&H green stamps. 








Hi Kaye,
Richard Carpenter also commented on his status.
Richard wrote: "Kelly Bradham and I visit about Nevada’s past every now and then. From sports to many other topics, we both like remembering the Nevada of our youth. One of our favorite topics has to do with the small mom and pop grocery stores that used to be everywhere in Nevada.  I received more phone calls about that article than any I had written for some time. This gave me incentive to go back to the Library, check out the old business directories, and see what I could find regarding those former neighborhood grocery stores.
Once again, I apologize if I have left off my list, your favorite store. As is often the case after publication, many people tell me of names I have forgotten to include. A good example is Chrisenberry’s. Several people reminded me of this store/ gas station that was located at the corner of Austin and Prewitt. Cox’s (family) Markets were found it two locations. One was on Cherry just east of the Legion Hall. The elder Mr. Cox operated this one. His son had the other family market at 629 S. Main where Ed Peterson now has his dental office. This last one was located only a half a block from my Grandmother’s home. Like many of the other small stores it commonly had charge accounts which people paid once a month. I was sent many times to pick up something for Grandmother, and I was so proud when I got to say “charge it.” 
About eight blocks due west was another neighborhood store called Ewing’s, at 627 S. College. Although I did not go there often, I knew many of the kids in that neighborhood, and they loved Ewing’s just as much as the kids from my neighborhood loved Cox’s. Ferguson’s (owned by Charley Ferguson) was to be found at 515 N. Ash. Charley was known to many kids because his store was so close to all the schools. When I went to Bryan Grade School it was one of our favorite stops, and Kelly Bradham considered it his favorite.
 Many of these little mom and pop markets had their own fresh meats and produce. In fact just about anything you find in a super market of today you could buy there. Each had it’s own personality and loyal customers. To many of us the passing of these stores from our community was sad. 
Here are some of the names I found, but there are more for sure. Andersons, Bill’s Food Mkt., Dowell’s, Hardins Groc., Horner’s, Karbe’s, Longstreth’s, Maxwells, O B Market, Schreibrel’s, Well’s, Wilson’s, A & P, Davis, Cottey Corner, Cozy Corner, Krogers, Safeway, Samuel’s, and Sid’s. . 
Not only could you find a local store within easy walking distance of your home almost anywhere in Nevada, you could also get free deliveries from most stores. There were several companies such as the Stanley Man, the Fuller Brush man, and the Jewel T man that made regular deliveries, of a vast array of items, to the home shopper. 
Sheila Merrit one of my high school classmates told me stories about her father Orville, who worked for Jewel T for many years. All of these small stores and delivery services are a thing of the past, and we are stuck with only two big super markets and Wal Mart, right? No, that is wrong. Things like these stores come and go, but the more they change the more they stay the same. I’m not crazy, you just don’t realize that we still have the little mom and pop stores. Today they are called “Convenience Stores.” In the current Nevada Phone Book, there are 10 “Convenience Stores” listed. That’s right TEN! First on the list are 3 Cash & Dash’s. The list also includes, Fastrip, The Truck Stop (Nevada Fuel Mart), “Gas Stations” on S. Barrett Ave., Quality Convenience Store, Ricketts Southside Plaza, Tim’s Convenience Store, and the Tobacco Shack. 
It really was surprising when I realized that there were so many of these small stores operating here in town. I might add, that they all seem to be thriving in much the same way as the old corner mom and pop places of my youth. The question begs to be asked, why are they doing so well, when they have to compete with the super markets and Wal Mart. They appear to succeed because they are first and foremost convenient. You can quickly get gas, soda pop, several grocery products, lottery tickets, tobacco, alcohol, and a long list of items. While prices tend to be higher than those in the super markets or at Wal Mart, customers seem oblivious to this lack of savings. It appears that convenience of location and speed are more important. In talking to several people they told me they have patronized practically all of these stores, but generally have a favorite.
 So to all including me, who worried that the big bad Wal Mart and other big chain stores were going to kill off our little local businesses, fear not. Just like when I was a kid and we saved our meager collection of coins so we could buy baseball cards and maybe even a coke at Cox’s, so too we see that the youngsters of today use our convenience stores as their “hangouts.” It really does my heart a lot of good to know, that while there appears to be many disturbing changes, the reality is that there is a lot less change than one would suspect. There is one alteration for today’s shopper. If you went in one of these stores now and said “charge it,” they would point to the debit card machine!!" 

Sunday, August 7, 2011

Birthday, Brunch, Beer and Bread Pudding


Andrew turned 27 today and after a late night of partying with friends we celebrated his birthday meeting for Brunch at Westport Cafe. http://www.westportcafeandbar.com/WCB.html

Saturday, August 6, 2011

Dad's Diner

While driving past a small empty restaurant building downtown the other day I thought of how cool it would be to open a diner. Then I thought I would call it Dad's Diner and feature Dad's favorite foods. The concept of the restaurant would be "home cooked" food served "living room" style. Living room style would be separate dining rooms with ottomans around a coffee table and a console TV to watch complete with remote.

If you chose the grilled cheese sandwich a sandwich maker would be brought to your coffee table along with all the ingredients to cook your grilled cheese sandwich.  All side dishes would be served family style in large bowls.


 Dessert would be Neapolitan Ice Cream (or what we called "All Three Kinds") sliced in large squares and served on a dinner plate.

Other menu items:
FRIED PORK CHOPS
MASHED POTATOES AND GRAVY (INCLUDES WHITE BREAD IN PIECES COATED WITH  GRAVY AND LOTS OF PEPPER)
CANNED CORN WITH LOTS OF PEPPER

FRIED CHICKEN
(SAME SIDE DISHES AS FRIED PORK CHOPS)
SUBSITUTE CANNED GREEN BEANS FOR CANNED CORN

MULLIGAN STEW WITH BISCUITS

GIANT PANCAKES WITH PEANUT BUTTER AND YOUR OWN BOTTLE OF SYRUP


CHEF BOYARDEE SPAGHETTI WITH GROUND BEEF

HOME MADE CHILI FROM CHILE BRICK WITH RED BEANS

GLAZED DONUTS WITH 32OZ. GLASS OF MILK

DRINKS: (ONLY 32 OZ. SIZE AVAILABLE)
POP
MILK
COFFEE
ICE WATER
KOOL AID

Friday, August 5, 2011

Them There Grand Kids and Them There Big Blue Eyes!






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Jo Linda Rogers, my 2nd grade friend

When I started 2nd grade at Franklin School I met a new friend, Jo Linda Rogers. We played on the play ground together, we had our desks side by side. I went to her house to play and she came to ours. One day when it was really cold Dad came home in the early evening and said he had to go back to work that Jo Linda was missing. I remember sitting on the couch and worrying about her. Where could she be it was dark, we always came home before dark and it was so cold and snowing! I sat by the front window waiting for Dad, who was a Police Officer to come back and tell me she was alright, but he come back and said they had found her drown in the creek behind her house. She was walking on the ice and fell through. She had followed her brother and his friend onto the ice after school, her brother told her to go away and they left her all alone. She turned back to go home and he said he did not see her again. I missed Jo Linda at school and often thought of her. Even today when I see a creek or hear the word ice and creek I think of Jo Linda. I google Jo Linda's name on googled news paper archives and found the old article, just as I had remembered how it happened when I was only 7 years old.


http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=wrEfAAAAIBAJ&sjid=PdcEAAAAIBAJ&pg=861,1507821&dq=nevada+mo+jo+linda+rogers&hl=en

Galen Anti-Van Prince Nov 1966

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=PlwfAAAAIBAJ&sjid=bNQEAAAAIBAJ&pg=1414,2977327&dq=nevada+missouri+news+brittingham&hl=en

Crusin' Nevada Mo 60's Style




-- On Fri, 7/29/11, Richard Carpenter <carp3@sbcglobal.net> wrote:  

Cruising
In the sixties, when I was a teenager, there was a ritual, that we all practiced and loved.   When I say we practiced, I could have easily said we followed, with near religious fervor the rules of this teenage custom.  This pursuit was known here and in towns and cities all over the country, as “CRUISING!”
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This very common performance by teenagers of the 60’s, was a nationwide phenomenon.  One of the best movies ever made “America Graffiti,” was based on this type of activity.   George Lucas, the director, used similar memories from his youth, in Modesto, California.   
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Who could ever forget a young Harrison Ford, as the new kid in town, challenging local hot rod legend, John Milner to a drag race.   Ask anyone who grew up here, about the drag races we used to have.
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In phone conversations, emails, and face book postings, one very common thought emerges when we children of the 60‘s talk about those times.   Boomers like us will be heard often making a statement like, “I don’t think the kids today are having as much fun as we did back then.”    
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Well, I have no doubt that that is true.   There is no way you will convince me, that texting can ever give as much pleasure as cruising gave us!  
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We had advantages that today’s teens don’t.   First of all, gas was cheap.   In high school in the mid sixties, you could buy gasoline for twenty plus cents a gallon.   Do you remember when we actually had what they called “gas wars.”   I can remember gas would go below the twenty cent mark during one of those price battles.  
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We also had cheap used cars.   It was not uncommon for a teen to find a old car for just a few hundred bucks.   There weren't many bells and whistles on these vehicles.   Many of us had a 4 door sedan, complete with all the features such as an A.M. radio and a heater.  
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In Nevada of those days, like Modesto in “American Graffiti” there was a regular route to cruise, and a regular place to pause.   In Modesto, the gathering place was “Mel’s Drive-In.   Here in Nevada there was more than one pausing place, but the most famous was the “White Grill.”
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On a typical night, especially on warm summer nights like we are having now, you would find the “cruise” full of cars, filled with teens.  Also called the “drag” or the “route,” both were well known to every teen in the area.
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If you left the White grill with a group of friends, you always headed west up Walnut towards the square.   Oh by the way, do you remember, that Walnut was actually 54 highway before Austin Blvd. was finished?
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When you reached the corner of Walnut and Washington, you turned south instead of proceeding to the square.   There was a huge hang down stop light at the next intersection at Cherry.   From there you went another block south where the highway turned west on Austin.
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The cruise turned  south on College at the blinking light near Cottey.   We drove down to Radio Springs before retracing our route back to the “Grill.”
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Gas was cheap, but most of us only made a few trips along the drag in a given evening.   After a couple of laps, we usually found a parking spot at the Grill, and sat on the hoods of our cars.   Oh, I should mention, that those car hoods and fenders, were made of metal, and they actually were strong enough for several teens to sit upon them without doing damage.
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Waving and honking were recognized customs of cruising.   If you did not wave and sometimes honk your horn at the other people on the cruise, they all wondered if your were mad about something.    
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At the Grill, they had curb hops who would bring these trays that would fit on your car window.   Getting a burger and suzies, was normal, but enjoying a Grill coke, was probably the best.   I wish I had one of those trays again.   For that matter, I wish I had a car again that would have a window that would actually hold such a tray.
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Now remember, we had no cell phones.   We actually used the English language to communicate.   The battle of the sexes was in full force throughout the cruise.   
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A group of guys would ride around in a car, while at the same time a similar group of girls would ride together.   Both sexes would try and manage somehow, to get to take a cruise with someone they were interested in.   
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If a couple finally got to take their first cruise together, by the time they had finished one lap, every other teen in town, knew about it.  No cell phones were needed, we had our own mysterious jungle telegraph system that spread the news.
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We did deviate from this wonderful car trek for another favorite hobby.  The Trail Drive-In theater was located east of Nevada about a mile or so.   In those days, there were two movies shown on Thursday through Saturday evenings, instead of just one on the other nights.
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Here again, the back couple of rows at the drive-in, were usually filled with car loads of teens.   Those warm nights were wonderful.   Outside of the cars, teens gathered before the movie, and at intermission.   We actually enjoyed seeing each other more than watching the movie.
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Now the cruise ended for some of the couples in a different way.  Their car was a refuge.   “Parking” and some kissing were considered normal teen behavior.   
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Later the guys used to meet either at the Grill again, or at some pre-selected country spot.   Talk would turn to girls, cars, and who had the cold beverages.  Give me just one more cruise. please!







(Brian Wilson/Mike Love)
Well she got her daddy's car
And she's cruisin' through the hamburger stand now
Seems she forgot all about the library
Like she told her old man now
And with the radio blasting
Goes cruising just as fast as she can now

And she'll have fun fun fun
'Til her daddy takes the T-Bird away
(Fun fun fun 'til her daddy takes the T-Bird away)

Well the girls can't stand her
'Cause she walks looks and drives like an ace now
(You walk like an ace now you walk like an ace)
She makes the Indy 500 look like a Roman chariot race now
(You look like an ace guys try to catch her
But she leads them on a wild goose chase now
(You drive like an ace now you drive like an ace)

And she'll have fun fun fun
'Til her daddy takes the T-Bird away
(Fun fun fun 'til her daddy takes the T-Bird away)

Well you knew all along
That your dad was gettin' wise to you now
(You shouldn't have lied now you shouldn't have lied)
And since he took your set of keys
You've been thinking that your fun is all through now
(You shouldn't have lied now you shouldn't have lied)

But you can come along with me
'Cause we gotta a lot of things to do now
(You shouldn't have lied now you shouldn't have lied)

And we'll have fun fun fun now that daddy took the T-Bird away
(Fun fun fun now that daddy took the T-Bird away)
And we'll have fun fun fun now that daddy took the T-Bird away
(Fun fun fun now that daddy took the T-Bird away)
(fun fun now that daddy took the T-Bird away)
(fun fun now that daddy took the T-Bird away)
(fun fun now that daddy took the T-Bird away)
(fun fun now that daddy took the T-Bird away)
(fun fun now that daddy took the T-Bird away)
(fun fun now that daddy took the T-Bird away